Archive for the ‘Legal’ Category

This is an email I received yesterday:  One of the proposed regulations would add a feral hog and coyote two week long season on WMA’s, right after turkey season.

DNR_Header

Hunting Regulations Focus at Upcoming Public Hearings

To save folks having to click multiple times, here are the public hearing locations and dates:

PUBLIC MEETINGS AND HEARINGS

Hunting Regulations Public Hearings: Hunters and other interested citizens are invited to attend any of three upcoming public hearings to provide comment on proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons:

APRIL 11, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 12, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 13, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Sports Complex and Civic Center (786 Austin Avenue East, Pearson, GA)

WRD recognizes that some individuals will not be able to make the public hearings.  At the public hearings, staff will give a brief presentation highlighting major changes in the proposed regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons.

To view a PDF of proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons, click HERE (link coming soon).

To view a PDF of the Powerpoint presentation to be presented at the hearings, click HERE (link coming soon).

Those unable to attend a public meeting or hearing may submit comments electronically or by mail. More information found HERE.

And here is the link to the proposed regulations, and recently added regulations:

HUNTING REGULATIONS

The purpose of hunting regulations is to manage Georgia’s game birds and game animals according to principles of sound wildlife management and to meet public objectives for use of these renewable natural resources.

PROPOSED REGULATIONS:

RECENTLY APPROVED REGULATIONS:

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Georgia Outdoor News

click to go to GON.com

By Daryl Kirby
Posted Thursday May 28 2015, 8:47 AM

Sportsmen are being asked to support efforts to raise hunting and fishing license fees. DNR’s Wildlife Resources Division (WRD) has cut services to sportsmen over the years because of mandated budget cuts, and WRD says more money would allow the agency to return those services and also enhance and start new efforts.

Georgia’s resident license fees haven’t increased since 1992, and Georgia’s current fees are either the least expensive or close to it in every category among 16 Southeastern states.

So far there are no specific details on what programs WRD might implement to help hunters and anglers, but sportsmen are encouraged to give their opinions on a license-fee increase and what they’d like to see WRD do with additional funding.

Seven open meetings are being held this month. Sportsmen should certainly attend. It’s your money.

Read the rest of the article at GON.com

(Here are the meetings scheduled)

WRD License-Fee Open Meetings

All meetings 3-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m.

June 15: Gainesville Civic Center
Chattahoochee Room, 830 Green Street NE, Gainesville, GA 30501

June 16: Baxley City Hall
City Council Meeting Room, 282 East Parker Street, Baxley, GA 31513

June 17: Richmond Hill City Center
520 Cedar Street (in J.F. Gregory Park), Richmond Hill, GA 31324

June 22: Grace Fellowship Church
1971 South Main Street, Greensboro, GA 30642

June 23: Red Top Mtn State Park
Group Shelter #1, 50 Lodge Road SE, Cartersville, GA 30121

June 24: Darton College
Room J121-123, 2400 Gillionville Road, Albany, GA 31707

June 25: Miller-Murphy-Howard Building Conference Room, Georgia National Fairgrounds
401 Larry Walker Parkway, (Exit 135 off I-75), Perry, GA 31069

From Bangor Daily News

Posted July 26, 2014, at 10:02 a.m.

 

Click to go to the main article.

Click to go to the main article.

The wording for the bear referendum, which will be Question 1 on the Nov. 4 ballot in Maine, appears simple enough. But voters shouldn’t be fooled into believing a “yes” vote will promise more than it can deliver.

Here’s the exact language: “Do you want to ban the use of bait, dogs or traps in bear hunting except to protect property, public safety or for research?”

According to the proposed legislation behind this question, here are several ways one easily can be misled by this simple question. The use of the word “or” between dogs and traps is not multiple choice. Voters shouldn’t be fooled into thinking they can somehow choose which of these three hunting methods to ban. A “yes” vote will ban all hunting of bears in Maine using bait and dogs and traps — all three methods, period.

The second half of Question 1 — “in bear hunting except to protect property, public safety, or for research” — doesn’t tell the whole story.

Again, the legislation behind this question prohibits all bear hunting scenarios in which bait, dogs and traps would be used by licensed recreational bear hunters. There are really no exceptions for licensed hunters, or the general public, relating to the use of baits, dogs and traps for legally killing or even relocating bears.

The legislation does allow the use of baits, dogs and traps to protect property, public safety or for research, but it restricts these methods solely to state and federal employees. A hunter shouldn’t expect to ever again be allowed to hunt bears over bait, with dogs or with traps if this referendum passes — unless he or she is employed by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife as a nuisance control agent.

And homeowners experiencing problems with marauding bears? They will not legally be authorized to kill or relocate an offending bear using bait, dogs or traps of any kind. They presumably will need to apply to IFW and get the agency to respond to their problem — possibly at a financial cost to them.

If this referendum passes, the unintended consequences are numerous.

Read the rest of the article HERE.

From Field & Stream

Conservationist

Click to go to the original post at Field & Stream

July 15 – 2014 – by Bob Marshall

This just in: If you’re a hunter or angler, your U.S. Senator probably doesn’t care much about you.

I can say that after watching how the Sportsman’s Act was effectively killed last week.

That vital package of measures needed to help fish, wildlife and sportsmen arrived on the Senate floor with bi-partisan support of 45 members, and little, if any, opposition. It included funding for absolutely critical habitat programs for fish and wildlife, as well as laws that would help guarantee sportsmen they could have access to hunting and fishing on federal lands. And your senators almost certainly told you they were in your corner. After all, they love sportsmen–they tell you that every chance they get.

But this is an election year, and the Senate floor has been a sniper’s alley for partisan concerns.

This is how it works: Once a bill makes it to the floor, senators from either side introduce amendments on controversial subjects unrelated to the measure at hand. They hope to force their opponents to cast a vote that they can then use to blast them with in the fall.

This is how The Washington Post reported the development:

“The possibility of a new, mostly partisan debate on gun control likely would upend debate on a bipartisan measure to expand hunting rights on federal lands that is considered a potential political lifeline for about a half dozen Democrats seeking reelection in Republican-leaning states.

“Senators of both parties are readying gun-related amendments and are poised to introduce them this week.”

The amendments didn’t just deal with guns but spanned the realm of politics, from funding the Palestinian government to selling off public lands. It was a feeding frenzy of partisan spite, with the real victims being fish, wildlife and sportsmen.

Now, do you think this would have happened if the bill concerned, say, Wall Street bankers, or the energy industry, or military contractors? Probably not.

In choosing this bill for this tactic, the senators were sending a very clear message to sportsmen: You don’t count.

Don’t take my word for it. Whit Fosburgh, president of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, had this analysis:

“[The Act] failed due to political infighting, a dysfunctional amendment process, and the extreme wings of both parties, who are more interested in scoring points than legislating on behalf of America’s hunters and anglers and the values of the population at large,” he said. “We are deeply disheartened that a bill with 45 bipartisan cosponsors and the support of the national sporting community could fall victim to a fundamentally broken Senate, where some legislators’ support for sportsmen is only a talking point.”

Read the rest at Field & Stream

 

(Notes – I do read Field & Stream (along with dozens of other publications) but hadn’t caught this particular bit of news. This was found via Wired to Hunt, and Mark found it on the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership.)

This is possibly the stupidest idea I’ve heard in a long, long, long time. 

From Bowhunting.com

By: Hunting Network – 1/17/2014

You know that a deer population is out of control when golfers are begging the city to do something about the “chaos” that they’re causing. That’s exactly what happened over the summer in Fairfax City, Virginia.

In July the Fairfax City Council voted on a proposed regulation that would have allowed bowhunting on private properties, 25 acres and larger, to those that were given a special permit. And that’s just the beginning of the regulations and “red tape” in the proposal. Further regulations included written submissions of dates and times hunting activity will occur, warning noticed placed no less than 50 yards apart on property lines, and more.

Click to go to the original story at Bowhunting.com

Click to go to the original story at Bowhunting.com

The City Council voted on the proposal and came to a 3-3 deadlock. The Council did, however, ask the city staff to begin working on completely ban hunting.

Fairfax City Mayor, Scott Silverthorne, commented that, “There’s no question we have a deer problem throughout the city, so the request is basically to allow, by permit, deer hunting. It’s really more of a wildlife management issue than a hunting issue.”

If bowhunting is not an option, then how does Fairfax plan to address their overpopulation of deer?

Sterilization

In December the Fairfax City officials approved a plan to manage the deer population which will involve a process to, “Tranquilize and capture all the female deer in the city, take them to a surgical table and remove their ovaries to keep them from reproducing.” The Council voted 3-3 on the hunting proposal, but the sterilization proposal passed easily, with a vote of 5-1.

Read the rest of this at Bowhunting.com

Help catch these thieves! Five stands stolen in Crawford County where a Wounded Warrior hunt was going to be hosted.

By GON Staff
Posted Thursday January 2 2014, 3:27 PM

Click to go to the GON.COM story and reward information

Click to go to the GON.COM story and reward information

A $1,000 reward is being offered with hopes to catch the lowlifes who stole five deer stands in Crawford County from a group that puts on hunts for wounded veterans. The stands were stolen near Lizella from the non-profit group Americans Helping Wounded Veterans—which uses 100 percent of all funds to put on hunts, with no organizational expenses at all unrelated to the hunts for veterans. The stands were stolen just before a hunt, which then had to be canceled.

CLICK the photo or THIS LINK to go to the full story.

(From GON.COM)

Georgia Outdoor News

Remember, Georgia Power powerlines are private.

By Joey Slaughter Biologist, Georgia Power
Posted Tuesday November 26 2013, 10:38 AM

Editor’s Note: Georgia Power Company (GPC) contacted GON and wanted to address two issues they are regularly dealing with in regards to their properties and powerlines.

Myth No. 1: Powerline rights-of-way are open to the public. Nothing could be further from the truth. In most cases, GPC has an easement with the landowner that only allows us to maintain our poles and lines through their property. Private individuals still own the land, and they control all access outside of our maintenance and operations. If you want to hunt, hike, ride, or simply visit a powerline right-of-way, you must have permission of the property owner unless the property is clearly marked allowing that activity and open to the public. You should contact the property owner directly for permission before you access any land.

Myth No. 2: All GPC lands are open to the public. Much of the land surrounding GPC lakes is owned by the company; however, recreation and public access are only allowed in designated areas. Only specific activities, noted in our plant operating licenses, are allowed in our public parks. These activities are also described on signage within the parks and on the GPC website. These lands are generally not available for hunting unless so advertised. You can waterfowl hunt some GPC lakes. For more info on those, go to http://www.georgiawildlife.com/Hunting/WaterfowlOpportunities?cat=1.

Some extended properties around GPC lakes, like Oconee and Rum Creek WMAs, are open to hunting but are managed by DNR. Currently, there are no public hunting lands managed by GPC.

Read the rest at GON.COM

 

From Petersen’s Hunting

Park Ranger Guilty of Poaching Keeps Job; Wins “You’re Fired!” Award

Mule-deerLast week, Colorado Parks and Wildlife demoted one of its employees from the field as a law enforcement officer to another park, where he now serves as a technician. The real question is why he has a job at all.

That’s because Travis McKay, a park ranger at Trinidad Lake State Park, was ticketed for poaching a trophy mule deer after hunting hours using artificial light, according to The Denver Post. According to Rick Cables, director of CPW, plenty of people within the organization were upset McKay wasn’t fired. No kidding.

According to The Denver Post, the officer who stopped McKay after his kill noticed it wasn’t tagged properly. McKay then lied to the officer about when the deer was shot, but text messages from McKay’s phone indicated it was well after dark. Eventually McKay admitted to using artificial light, was fined $11,000 and demoted to maintenance worker at another park.

(NOTE: Usually I avoid political posts on this blog – I made the blog for our archery shoot, I’ve put movie reviews, recipes, hunting tips, videos, etc. on here, but this directly affects hunting, therefore it’s fair game. – Niko)

From “100 Percent Fed Up” on FaceBook

Democrats Seek to Ban Hunting Ammunition in Wisconsin, Would Make It Illegal To Hunt Deer And Bear In The State…

A Democratic state senator and three Democratic state representatives have circulated draft legislation that would ban civilian possession of hollow point or frangible ammunition. According to existing Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources regulations, sportsmen and women in Wisconsin must use such ammunition when hunting deer or bear. The Democratic lawmakers, two of whom are freshman, all hail from urban districts in the City of Milwaukee.

The reasoning behind the legislation is a bit muddled. The impact, however, is quite clear. According to a legislative counsel review of the legislation, it would essentially make it impossible for civilians to hunt deer or bear in Wisconsin.

“The provision in the bill draft that provides whoever intentionally sells, transports or possesses any bullet that expands or flattens easily in the human body is guilty of a Class H felony conflicts with current DNR hunting rules. Under s. NR 10.09 (1)(c)2., ‘no person shall hunt any deer or bear with any air rifle, rim-fire rifle, any center-fire rifle less than .22 caliber, any .410 bore or less shotgun or handgun loaded with .410 shotgun shell ammunition or with ammunition loaded with nonexpanding type bullets or ammunition loaded with shot other than a single slug or projectile.’ The bill draft does not provide an exception to the prohibition on possessing expanding bullets for deer or bear hunting.” (Emphasis added)

The draft legislation (linked to below) was circulated this week by Sen. Nikiya Harris (D), Rep. Mandela Barnes, (D), Rep. Evan Goyke (D), and Rep. Fred Kessler (D). Mandela and Goyke are freshman lawmakers elected just last November. A phone call around 3:00 pm to Rep. Goyke’s office went unanswered, as did phone calls to Rep. Kessler’s office and Sen. Harris’s office.

Read the rest of the story at Media Trackers

(I saw this on Dan Schmidt’s Twitter feed this morning @DanSchmidtDeer)

From Deer & Deer Hunting magazine

austin-spain-inAn Indiana man has admitted to illegally killing a 16-point whitetail buck that could meet criteria for Boone and Crockett record standards.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources officials said Austin M. Spain, 21, of Lynn, Ind., admitted to killing the buck after already killing one earlier in the Indiana season. Hunters in Indiana are allowed to kill just one buck per season.

The Indianapolis Star reported that Spain shot the buck the weekend of Nov. 17-18, but already had killed a buck. Indiana DNR officials said during its investigation that Spain admitted illegally killing the deer after initially saying it had been killed in Michigan. State officials did not say what prompted the investigation.

Read the rest at Deer & Deer Hunting magazine.