Archive for the ‘Regulations’ Category

I’ve been obsessing over Steven Rinella’s Meat Eater series on NetFlix for a few months.  I don’t care for most of the hunting TV shows that are currently in production: the pacing, music, Overly Out There Product Placement, and to me, the fact that if you watch and listen closely, a lot of the shows are on private hunting properties that the average hunter could only afford to visit after winning the lottery.

Meat Eater is almost exactly the opposite.  I’ve only watched seasons five and six, those being the two on NetFlix, and I can’t purchase the series on DVD, because it’s not offered on DVD.  (Note to self – check the cost of adding a DVR to pick up other episodes from broadcasts.)  In the two seasons I’ve watched, I don’t think he ever says the word ‘Vortex,’ which is the spotting scope, binocular, and rifle scope brand he uses, but he doesn’t need to. Between the Vortex hats and seeing the equipment, you know that it’s his preferred (or sponsored) brand. The same with all of the products in the show, really.  Now I know on broadcasts, the channel adds ‘This segment of Meat Eater is brought to you by…’ but that’s not in the actual episode.  The music is RIGHT, the production value is excellent, and he brings a different kind of feel to the hunting and fishing he does, because he really is in it for the MEAT.  There are episodes where he is after an exceptional specimen, like the mule deer hunt with Callahan in central Idaho, but even then, he’s after the meat, and that’s what gets taken care of first.

One of the episodes is a pronghorn hunt on BLM land, ‘Lobster of the Prairie: Wyoming Antelope,’  and that made me start looking into hunting pronghorn on public land.

The first thing I noticed, repeated on a dozen forums and published articles on Pronghorn hunting, is to beware of ‘guided’ hunts, because they are typically going to be a lot of money for somebody to drive you around until you spot antelope.  Which you can do yourself, without adding $1,800 of cost to the experience.  But I just started researching this in the last few days, and as usual, from the outside it looks like it will take longer to decipher the regulations than it will to get to Wyoming, and that’s a 28 hour drive for me. (Atlanta to Casper, Wyoming)

We’ll see what happens – just starting to work a budget up for the trip, if I’m driving it, would start with roughly $800 in gasoline at today’s prices.  Around $350 for the license (including doe tags), plus food costs, and lodging.  My original thought was ‘camp, plenty of campgrounds near Casper’ but the wife wants to go, and I made the mistake of pointing out that several of the forums I read noted that there is a great public and private land area just half an hour outside of Casper, and that the person I was reading had stayed in a hotel, so add however many days in a hotel to the bill and it’s probably inching closer to $3,000.  Add boarding the dogs and having the cats looked after for the ten days, and now we’re getting closer to $4,000…. you get the idea.

So I’ll START looking into it now, we’ll see if I manage it before I retire.  (Which is years away yet.)

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One of my father’s pronghorn mounts from 40+ years ago.

This is an email I received yesterday:  One of the proposed regulations would add a feral hog and coyote two week long season on WMA’s, right after turkey season.

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Hunting Regulations Focus at Upcoming Public Hearings

To save folks having to click multiple times, here are the public hearing locations and dates:

PUBLIC MEETINGS AND HEARINGS

Hunting Regulations Public Hearings: Hunters and other interested citizens are invited to attend any of three upcoming public hearings to provide comment on proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons:

APRIL 11, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 12, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 13, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Sports Complex and Civic Center (786 Austin Avenue East, Pearson, GA)

WRD recognizes that some individuals will not be able to make the public hearings.  At the public hearings, staff will give a brief presentation highlighting major changes in the proposed regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons.

To view a PDF of proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons, click HERE (link coming soon).

To view a PDF of the Powerpoint presentation to be presented at the hearings, click HERE (link coming soon).

Those unable to attend a public meeting or hearing may submit comments electronically or by mail. More information found HERE.

And here is the link to the proposed regulations, and recently added regulations:

HUNTING REGULATIONS

The purpose of hunting regulations is to manage Georgia’s game birds and game animals according to principles of sound wildlife management and to meet public objectives for use of these renewable natural resources.

PROPOSED REGULATIONS:

RECENTLY APPROVED REGULATIONS:

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Frustrating, trying to find an open public hunting area this year, isn’t it?  The DNR has eight public hearings coming up in January – I highly recommend folks attend these hearings and join the discussion.

From Georgiawildlife.com:

“PUBLIC MEETINGS AND HEARINGS

Hunting Regulations Public Meetings: Hunters and other interested citizens are invited to attend any of eight upcoming public meetings regarding the development of hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons:

JAN. 9, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Merle Manders Conference Center (111 Davis Road, Stockbridge, GA 30281)
  • Stellar Center (144 Stellar Drive, Brunswick, GA 31525)

JAN. 10, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Southern Regional Technical College (800 Veterans Parkway North, Moultrie, GA 31788)
  • Southeastern Technical College (3001 East 1st Street, Vidalia, GA 30474)

JAN. 11, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Augusta Tech College (216 Hwy. 24 South, Waynesboro, GA 30830)
  • Middle Georgia State University-Dillard Hall (1100 Second Street, SE, Cochran, GA 31014)

JAN. 12, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Lion’s Club Barn (1729 South Main Street, Ellijay, GA 30540)
  • Banks Co. High School (1486 Historic Homer Hwy., Homer, GA 30547)”

For 2016 – the Georgia Department of Natural Resources is instituting a game check system: all turkey and deer MUST be entered on your harvest record and checked through the Game Check system within 72 hours.

 

I also see two new Wildlife Management Areas and a new Outdoors Georgia app.

The new WMA’s are Altama Plantation, “The Georgia Department of Natural Resources recently announced the opening of a 3,986-acre tract in Glynn County along I-95 and the Altamaha River, known as Altama Plantation WMA.” (GON.com, Jan 7 2016 )and Buck Shoals WMA. (The only ‘good’ information on Buck Shoals that I can find is above in the PDF.)

 

 

(Sorry I’ve been absent lately, much to do and little time to do it in.)

It’s that time of year again: time to put in for quota hunts or add to your preference points!

GeorgiaDNR

Click to go to the Georgia DNR Quota Hunt page

Remember – if you just want to build preference points, select a quota hunt, but don’t select a hunt choice – the system will automatically add a preference point to your account after the close of open registration.

From Bangor Daily News

Posted July 26, 2014, at 10:02 a.m.

 

Click to go to the main article.

Click to go to the main article.

The wording for the bear referendum, which will be Question 1 on the Nov. 4 ballot in Maine, appears simple enough. But voters shouldn’t be fooled into believing a “yes” vote will promise more than it can deliver.

Here’s the exact language: “Do you want to ban the use of bait, dogs or traps in bear hunting except to protect property, public safety or for research?”

According to the proposed legislation behind this question, here are several ways one easily can be misled by this simple question. The use of the word “or” between dogs and traps is not multiple choice. Voters shouldn’t be fooled into thinking they can somehow choose which of these three hunting methods to ban. A “yes” vote will ban all hunting of bears in Maine using bait and dogs and traps — all three methods, period.

The second half of Question 1 — “in bear hunting except to protect property, public safety, or for research” — doesn’t tell the whole story.

Again, the legislation behind this question prohibits all bear hunting scenarios in which bait, dogs and traps would be used by licensed recreational bear hunters. There are really no exceptions for licensed hunters, or the general public, relating to the use of baits, dogs and traps for legally killing or even relocating bears.

The legislation does allow the use of baits, dogs and traps to protect property, public safety or for research, but it restricts these methods solely to state and federal employees. A hunter shouldn’t expect to ever again be allowed to hunt bears over bait, with dogs or with traps if this referendum passes — unless he or she is employed by the Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife as a nuisance control agent.

And homeowners experiencing problems with marauding bears? They will not legally be authorized to kill or relocate an offending bear using bait, dogs or traps of any kind. They presumably will need to apply to IFW and get the agency to respond to their problem — possibly at a financial cost to them.

If this referendum passes, the unintended consequences are numerous.

Read the rest of the article HERE.

From Field & Stream

Conservationist

Click to go to the original post at Field & Stream

July 15 – 2014 – by Bob Marshall

This just in: If you’re a hunter or angler, your U.S. Senator probably doesn’t care much about you.

I can say that after watching how the Sportsman’s Act was effectively killed last week.

That vital package of measures needed to help fish, wildlife and sportsmen arrived on the Senate floor with bi-partisan support of 45 members, and little, if any, opposition. It included funding for absolutely critical habitat programs for fish and wildlife, as well as laws that would help guarantee sportsmen they could have access to hunting and fishing on federal lands. And your senators almost certainly told you they were in your corner. After all, they love sportsmen–they tell you that every chance they get.

But this is an election year, and the Senate floor has been a sniper’s alley for partisan concerns.

This is how it works: Once a bill makes it to the floor, senators from either side introduce amendments on controversial subjects unrelated to the measure at hand. They hope to force their opponents to cast a vote that they can then use to blast them with in the fall.

This is how The Washington Post reported the development:

“The possibility of a new, mostly partisan debate on gun control likely would upend debate on a bipartisan measure to expand hunting rights on federal lands that is considered a potential political lifeline for about a half dozen Democrats seeking reelection in Republican-leaning states.

“Senators of both parties are readying gun-related amendments and are poised to introduce them this week.”

The amendments didn’t just deal with guns but spanned the realm of politics, from funding the Palestinian government to selling off public lands. It was a feeding frenzy of partisan spite, with the real victims being fish, wildlife and sportsmen.

Now, do you think this would have happened if the bill concerned, say, Wall Street bankers, or the energy industry, or military contractors? Probably not.

In choosing this bill for this tactic, the senators were sending a very clear message to sportsmen: You don’t count.

Don’t take my word for it. Whit Fosburgh, president of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, had this analysis:

“[The Act] failed due to political infighting, a dysfunctional amendment process, and the extreme wings of both parties, who are more interested in scoring points than legislating on behalf of America’s hunters and anglers and the values of the population at large,” he said. “We are deeply disheartened that a bill with 45 bipartisan cosponsors and the support of the national sporting community could fall victim to a fundamentally broken Senate, where some legislators’ support for sportsmen is only a talking point.”

Read the rest at Field & Stream

 

(Notes – I do read Field & Stream (along with dozens of other publications) but hadn’t caught this particular bit of news. This was found via Wired to Hunt, and Mark found it on the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership.)

(From GON.COM)

Georgia Outdoor News

Remember, Georgia Power powerlines are private.

By Joey Slaughter Biologist, Georgia Power
Posted Tuesday November 26 2013, 10:38 AM

Editor’s Note: Georgia Power Company (GPC) contacted GON and wanted to address two issues they are regularly dealing with in regards to their properties and powerlines.

Myth No. 1: Powerline rights-of-way are open to the public. Nothing could be further from the truth. In most cases, GPC has an easement with the landowner that only allows us to maintain our poles and lines through their property. Private individuals still own the land, and they control all access outside of our maintenance and operations. If you want to hunt, hike, ride, or simply visit a powerline right-of-way, you must have permission of the property owner unless the property is clearly marked allowing that activity and open to the public. You should contact the property owner directly for permission before you access any land.

Myth No. 2: All GPC lands are open to the public. Much of the land surrounding GPC lakes is owned by the company; however, recreation and public access are only allowed in designated areas. Only specific activities, noted in our plant operating licenses, are allowed in our public parks. These activities are also described on signage within the parks and on the GPC website. These lands are generally not available for hunting unless so advertised. You can waterfowl hunt some GPC lakes. For more info on those, go to http://www.georgiawildlife.com/Hunting/WaterfowlOpportunities?cat=1.

Some extended properties around GPC lakes, like Oconee and Rum Creek WMAs, are open to hunting but are managed by DNR. Currently, there are no public hunting lands managed by GPC.

Read the rest at GON.COM

 

It’s time to apply for quota hunts again!

Go to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources website, click on ‘hunting,’ then ‘Quota Hunts,’ or click THIS LINK.

GA_DNR_Quota1 From there, use the upper right corner of the screen to log in, or if you don’t have an account, you can use it to create an account from the login screen.

Remember – if you just want to collect preference points, do NOT select a hunt, simply click on the type of hunt (i.e. Alligator, or Deer) and click ‘save application’ when you get into the hunt, this auto-selects you to simply receive preference points at the end of the selection period.

From the “How To Apply” section of the website:

 

 

 

About Quota Hunt – Instructions – Apply for a Quota Hunt

HOW TO APPLY FOR A QUOTA HUNT

  1. Log In to the system.
  2. Click on the Quota Hunt tab.
  3. Select “APPLY NOW / Open Applications” from the dropdown menu.
  4. A list of all hunt types that are open for applications will appear.
  5. Select “APPLY NOW” next to the hunt type for which you would like to submit an application.
  6. You will be taken to the actual application for that hunt type.
  7. If you have accumulated priority points, then select the number of priority points that you wish to allocate to your application.
  8. If you wish to submit a group application, then select Add Applicant (you can search by first name/last name or full SSN).
  9. When you find the correct person, then select them by clicking on their information and it will become highlighted. Click “OK”. Repeat this step until you have added all members of your group.
  10. Click “Add Choice” to select your hunt choices in priority order. Click on your first hunt choice and it will become highlighted. Click “OK”. Repeat this step until you have added all of the hunts that you want on your application.
  11. Click on the red “Save Application” button.
  12. This message will appear: “Your Application has been saved successfully. PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR APPLICATION DETAILS BELOW BEFORE YOU LOG OUT. YOU MAY MAKE CHANGES UNTIL THE APPLICATION DEADLINE.”
  13. You have successfully submitted your application.”

WRD’s proposed hunting regulations address lower deer numbers by reducing either-sex days for much of the state.

From Georgia Outdoor News

By GON Staff Posted Tuesday April 2 2013, 11:01 AM

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The proposed either-sex deer-hunting days for next season include no doe days from Dec. 1 to Dec. 25 for much of the state. (Click to enlarge)

In response to hunter concerns and complaints about lower deer numbers, the state is proposing a 25-day reduction in either-sex deer-hunting days for much of the state.

Except in counties with QDM regulations and some counties in the north Georgia mountains, antlerless deer would not be legal Dec. 1 through Dec. 25 next season. The proposed regulations still have to be passed by the Department of Natural Resources board, and hunters have until April 30 to comment on the proposals.

In much of the Northern Zone, either-sex days would be reduced 33 percent from 75 days to 50 days. However, in the QDM counties of Hancock, Meriwether and Troup, every day of firearms season would remain a doe day (75 total either-sex days during gun season). In the mountains, either-sex days in Fannin, Rabun, Towns and Union counties would be reduced from eight to six days. In Banks, Franklin, Gilmer, Habersham, Hart, Lumpkin, Murray, Stephens, White and Whitfield counties, the number of either-sex days would drop to 18 days from 26 days.

In the Southern Zone, the QDM counties of Dooly, Harris, Macon, Montgomery, Randolph and Talbot would continue to have either-sex days every day of firearms season (89 days), while the rest of the Southern Zone would be reduced by 25 days to a total of 64 days (either-sex hunting would be closed from Dec. 1 to Dec. 25).

All archery hunting remains either-sex, including during firearms season.

Meanwhile, WRD did not ask the legislature to consider reducing the deer limit. Either-sex days can be changed by WRD, but deer limits fall under state law and must be changed by the legislature. When deer limits were last increased, the legislature changed the law based on WRD recommendations.

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