Archive for the ‘Management’ Category

This is an email I received yesterday:  One of the proposed regulations would add a feral hog and coyote two week long season on WMA’s, right after turkey season.

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Hunting Regulations Focus at Upcoming Public Hearings

To save folks having to click multiple times, here are the public hearing locations and dates:

PUBLIC MEETINGS AND HEARINGS

Hunting Regulations Public Hearings: Hunters and other interested citizens are invited to attend any of three upcoming public hearings to provide comment on proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons:

APRIL 11, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 12, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 13, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Sports Complex and Civic Center (786 Austin Avenue East, Pearson, GA)

WRD recognizes that some individuals will not be able to make the public hearings.  At the public hearings, staff will give a brief presentation highlighting major changes in the proposed regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons.

To view a PDF of proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons, click HERE (link coming soon).

To view a PDF of the Powerpoint presentation to be presented at the hearings, click HERE (link coming soon).

Those unable to attend a public meeting or hearing may submit comments electronically or by mail. More information found HERE.

And here is the link to the proposed regulations, and recently added regulations:

HUNTING REGULATIONS

The purpose of hunting regulations is to manage Georgia’s game birds and game animals according to principles of sound wildlife management and to meet public objectives for use of these renewable natural resources.

PROPOSED REGULATIONS:

RECENTLY APPROVED REGULATIONS:

I spent an hour or so somewhat shed hunting – I say ‘somewhat,’ because where I was shed hunting, I couldn’t actually pick the sheds up and bring them home.  That’s OK, I just wanted to FIND them more than have them.  I was looking in the area I spotted this buck last November:

aaa

I didn’t find any sheds, but I’m pretty sure I spotted him sneaking away from a patch of woods I was walking through, I couldn’t get a decent look at him, but the body language, low and steady, but still fast, with no tail flagging, just made me think that it was a mature, confident buck, just sneaking out of his patch.

I found multiple tree stands, in an area where there shouldn’t be any tree stands, and game trails that looked like the trails you find in a pasture that has been used for dairy cows for decades.

It was a fun walk, the area was much more open than the photos I took in November would lead one to believe.

10pt_7

I may head back, and hopefully this time, I’ll remember my camera.

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Frustrating, trying to find an open public hunting area this year, isn’t it?  The DNR has eight public hearings coming up in January – I highly recommend folks attend these hearings and join the discussion.

From Georgiawildlife.com:

“PUBLIC MEETINGS AND HEARINGS

Hunting Regulations Public Meetings: Hunters and other interested citizens are invited to attend any of eight upcoming public meetings regarding the development of hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons:

JAN. 9, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Merle Manders Conference Center (111 Davis Road, Stockbridge, GA 30281)
  • Stellar Center (144 Stellar Drive, Brunswick, GA 31525)

JAN. 10, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Southern Regional Technical College (800 Veterans Parkway North, Moultrie, GA 31788)
  • Southeastern Technical College (3001 East 1st Street, Vidalia, GA 30474)

JAN. 11, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Augusta Tech College (216 Hwy. 24 South, Waynesboro, GA 30830)
  • Middle Georgia State University-Dillard Hall (1100 Second Street, SE, Cochran, GA 31014)

JAN. 12, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Lion’s Club Barn (1729 South Main Street, Ellijay, GA 30540)
  • Banks Co. High School (1486 Historic Homer Hwy., Homer, GA 30547)”

For 2016 – the Georgia Department of Natural Resources is instituting a game check system: all turkey and deer MUST be entered on your harvest record and checked through the Game Check system within 72 hours.

 

I also see two new Wildlife Management Areas and a new Outdoors Georgia app.

The new WMA’s are Altama Plantation, “The Georgia Department of Natural Resources recently announced the opening of a 3,986-acre tract in Glynn County along I-95 and the Altamaha River, known as Altama Plantation WMA.” (GON.com, Jan 7 2016 )and Buck Shoals WMA. (The only ‘good’ information on Buck Shoals that I can find is above in the PDF.)

 

 

It was very cold in the treestand this morning.  I’m from northern Ohio, and while people from places even further north can sneer about the cold there, I know about ‘being cold in a treestand,’ so when I say it was very cold this morning, believe it.

I sat in the stand, and over two hours, quietly added more and more Hot-Hands to my active collection. One in each boot, one in each thigh pocket, one in each hip pocket, and one in each jacket pocket.

Regardless, I have a reputation to maintain as something of a Sasquatch, so I’ll just say ‘it was very cold,’ and move on. 🙂

I saw a hog around 8:30 a.m., running back and forth along a fence line downhill of me, and the round little porker kept running the same trail, along the fence, then up the hill next to me, then back down the hill, then along the fence again, for almost an hour.

Finally, a larger boar came down the hill, and the first hog hauled ashes out of there for parts without a mean old boar to argue with.  I glassed the boar, and while I’ve never shot a feral hog before, I thought I’d let it pass and wait for something bigger.  The boar followed the sow down the hill, across the fence from left to right, but this time they both kept moving instead of turning around to come back.

There was a father and son team a few hundred yards further down the trail from me, and having spoken to them in camp the night before, I knew they had never hunted big game , so I was happy to hear a shot from that direction.   Then I heard two more shots, and thought that would mean that they were finishing off the boar, but to my surprise, the boar came back along the fence with a wound on its neck, just above where the guide said to shoot a boar for a certain, quick kill.

I don’t like wounded animals, and this one wasn’t going down with a flesh wound, so I shot it in the proper spot and that was that.

DSCF1480

The hunt was with Hog Wild USA, near Macon, Georgia.

From Field & Stream

Conservationist

Click to go to the original post at Field & Stream

July 15 – 2014 – by Bob Marshall

This just in: If you’re a hunter or angler, your U.S. Senator probably doesn’t care much about you.

I can say that after watching how the Sportsman’s Act was effectively killed last week.

That vital package of measures needed to help fish, wildlife and sportsmen arrived on the Senate floor with bi-partisan support of 45 members, and little, if any, opposition. It included funding for absolutely critical habitat programs for fish and wildlife, as well as laws that would help guarantee sportsmen they could have access to hunting and fishing on federal lands. And your senators almost certainly told you they were in your corner. After all, they love sportsmen–they tell you that every chance they get.

But this is an election year, and the Senate floor has been a sniper’s alley for partisan concerns.

This is how it works: Once a bill makes it to the floor, senators from either side introduce amendments on controversial subjects unrelated to the measure at hand. They hope to force their opponents to cast a vote that they can then use to blast them with in the fall.

This is how The Washington Post reported the development:

“The possibility of a new, mostly partisan debate on gun control likely would upend debate on a bipartisan measure to expand hunting rights on federal lands that is considered a potential political lifeline for about a half dozen Democrats seeking reelection in Republican-leaning states.

“Senators of both parties are readying gun-related amendments and are poised to introduce them this week.”

The amendments didn’t just deal with guns but spanned the realm of politics, from funding the Palestinian government to selling off public lands. It was a feeding frenzy of partisan spite, with the real victims being fish, wildlife and sportsmen.

Now, do you think this would have happened if the bill concerned, say, Wall Street bankers, or the energy industry, or military contractors? Probably not.

In choosing this bill for this tactic, the senators were sending a very clear message to sportsmen: You don’t count.

Don’t take my word for it. Whit Fosburgh, president of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, had this analysis:

“[The Act] failed due to political infighting, a dysfunctional amendment process, and the extreme wings of both parties, who are more interested in scoring points than legislating on behalf of America’s hunters and anglers and the values of the population at large,” he said. “We are deeply disheartened that a bill with 45 bipartisan cosponsors and the support of the national sporting community could fall victim to a fundamentally broken Senate, where some legislators’ support for sportsmen is only a talking point.”

Read the rest at Field & Stream

 

(Notes – I do read Field & Stream (along with dozens of other publications) but hadn’t caught this particular bit of news. This was found via Wired to Hunt, and Mark found it on the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership.)

A coyote grabs dog 10 feet from horrified woman in Morgan County.

By Brad Gill
Posted Wednesday April 23 2014, 9:48 AM

Georgia Outdoor News

click to go to GON.com

It’s uncomfortable to even think about, but try to imagine a coyote carrying off your family dog, one you’ve had for nine years…GON_dog

Bruce Weiner, of Atlanta, has owned a Morgan County farm for 20 years. While living in Atlanta, he often takes his family out to the farm to enjoy the slower-paced lifestyle.

“We’ve seen armadillos, deer, turkey, wild boar, snakes, but we’ve never seen a coyote on the property,” said Bruce.

Also 20 years ago, Bruce and his wife hired a nanny, Jennifer Lang, to help with the kids. Although Bruce’s kids are pretty much grown now, Jennifer is still the nanny. One of her current responsibilities is taking care of the dogs.

Back in February, Jennifer was at the farm and let all three of the family’s dogs outside.

“It was right at 6 p.m., right at dusk,” said Bruce. “Within minutes—she turned her back for just a second—she heard one of the dogs crying, and what looked like a big dog was taking off with one of our dogs, a 3 1/2-lb. yorkshire terrier.

“It just grabbed it and carried her off in its mouth right in front of our nanny—10 feet in front of her!”

Read More Here

 

(As a side note, I would hate to be a coyote that tried to snatch one o’ my dogs. Brody is 90#, Gretchen 85#, and Cinders is 45#. Since this photo was taken, we’ve added a large German Shepherd to our pack.)

 

Brody is the dog on the left, Gretchen is in the middle and Cinders on the right. Since this photo, we've added a 90# GSD to our pack.

Brody is the dog on the left, Gretchen is in the middle and Cinders on the right. Since this photo, we’ve added a 90# GSD to our pack.

This is possibly the stupidest idea I’ve heard in a long, long, long time. 

From Bowhunting.com

By: Hunting Network – 1/17/2014

You know that a deer population is out of control when golfers are begging the city to do something about the “chaos” that they’re causing. That’s exactly what happened over the summer in Fairfax City, Virginia.

In July the Fairfax City Council voted on a proposed regulation that would have allowed bowhunting on private properties, 25 acres and larger, to those that were given a special permit. And that’s just the beginning of the regulations and “red tape” in the proposal. Further regulations included written submissions of dates and times hunting activity will occur, warning noticed placed no less than 50 yards apart on property lines, and more.

Click to go to the original story at Bowhunting.com

Click to go to the original story at Bowhunting.com

The City Council voted on the proposal and came to a 3-3 deadlock. The Council did, however, ask the city staff to begin working on completely ban hunting.

Fairfax City Mayor, Scott Silverthorne, commented that, “There’s no question we have a deer problem throughout the city, so the request is basically to allow, by permit, deer hunting. It’s really more of a wildlife management issue than a hunting issue.”

If bowhunting is not an option, then how does Fairfax plan to address their overpopulation of deer?

Sterilization

In December the Fairfax City officials approved a plan to manage the deer population which will involve a process to, “Tranquilize and capture all the female deer in the city, take them to a surgical table and remove their ovaries to keep them from reproducing.” The Council voted 3-3 on the hunting proposal, but the sterilization proposal passed easily, with a vote of 5-1.

Read the rest of this at Bowhunting.com

I’m not very happy with these photographs – the hog that left this blood got off of the property, and we didn’t have permission to follow it onto the property it crossed into.

The only consolation is this – this property has not, before now, had invasive hogs on it, nor does the property owner WANT hogs on it, and while I am deeply upset that I didn’t cleanly kill the hog and bring it home to my freezer, it’s not coming back to this stretch o’ woods anytime soon.