Archive for the ‘Fishing’ Category

This is an email I received yesterday:  One of the proposed regulations would add a feral hog and coyote two week long season on WMA’s, right after turkey season.

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Hunting Regulations Focus at Upcoming Public Hearings

To save folks having to click multiple times, here are the public hearing locations and dates:

PUBLIC MEETINGS AND HEARINGS

Hunting Regulations Public Hearings: Hunters and other interested citizens are invited to attend any of three upcoming public hearings to provide comment on proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons:

APRIL 11, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 12, 2017: 7 P.M.

APRIL 13, 2017: 7 P.M.

  • Sports Complex and Civic Center (786 Austin Avenue East, Pearson, GA)

WRD recognizes that some individuals will not be able to make the public hearings.  At the public hearings, staff will give a brief presentation highlighting major changes in the proposed regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons.

To view a PDF of proposed hunting regulations for the 2017-2018 and 2018-2019 hunting seasons, click HERE (link coming soon).

To view a PDF of the Powerpoint presentation to be presented at the hearings, click HERE (link coming soon).

Those unable to attend a public meeting or hearing may submit comments electronically or by mail. More information found HERE.

And here is the link to the proposed regulations, and recently added regulations:

HUNTING REGULATIONS

The purpose of hunting regulations is to manage Georgia’s game birds and game animals according to principles of sound wildlife management and to meet public objectives for use of these renewable natural resources.

PROPOSED REGULATIONS:

RECENTLY APPROVED REGULATIONS:

For 2016 – the Georgia Department of Natural Resources is instituting a game check system: all turkey and deer MUST be entered on your harvest record and checked through the Game Check system within 72 hours.

 

I also see two new Wildlife Management Areas and a new Outdoors Georgia app.

The new WMA’s are Altama Plantation, “The Georgia Department of Natural Resources recently announced the opening of a 3,986-acre tract in Glynn County along I-95 and the Altamaha River, known as Altama Plantation WMA.” (GON.com, Jan 7 2016 )and Buck Shoals WMA. (The only ‘good’ information on Buck Shoals that I can find is above in the PDF.)

 

 

Merry Christmas from 323 Archery (pretty much Clay and myself) and Gable Sporting Goods!

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Sponsored by Gable Sporting Goods

Stop by the shop – We have PSE, Hoyt, Matthews, Bowtech, Diamond and Elite bows in stock!

Georgia Outdoor News

click to go to GON.com

By Daryl Kirby
Posted Thursday May 28 2015, 8:47 AM

Sportsmen are being asked to support efforts to raise hunting and fishing license fees. DNR’s Wildlife Resources Division (WRD) has cut services to sportsmen over the years because of mandated budget cuts, and WRD says more money would allow the agency to return those services and also enhance and start new efforts.

Georgia’s resident license fees haven’t increased since 1992, and Georgia’s current fees are either the least expensive or close to it in every category among 16 Southeastern states.

So far there are no specific details on what programs WRD might implement to help hunters and anglers, but sportsmen are encouraged to give their opinions on a license-fee increase and what they’d like to see WRD do with additional funding.

Seven open meetings are being held this month. Sportsmen should certainly attend. It’s your money.

Read the rest of the article at GON.com

(Here are the meetings scheduled)

WRD License-Fee Open Meetings

All meetings 3-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m.

June 15: Gainesville Civic Center
Chattahoochee Room, 830 Green Street NE, Gainesville, GA 30501

June 16: Baxley City Hall
City Council Meeting Room, 282 East Parker Street, Baxley, GA 31513

June 17: Richmond Hill City Center
520 Cedar Street (in J.F. Gregory Park), Richmond Hill, GA 31324

June 22: Grace Fellowship Church
1971 South Main Street, Greensboro, GA 30642

June 23: Red Top Mtn State Park
Group Shelter #1, 50 Lodge Road SE, Cartersville, GA 30121

June 24: Darton College
Room J121-123, 2400 Gillionville Road, Albany, GA 31707

June 25: Miller-Murphy-Howard Building Conference Room, Georgia National Fairgrounds
401 Larry Walker Parkway, (Exit 135 off I-75), Perry, GA 31069

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by Ben O’Brien | March 21st, 2014
Petersens_meat_eatersI’m just going to come out and say it: Right now intellectual foodies might just be saving hunting.

Some call them culinary pioneers, others call them counter-culture loving hipsters. No matter the label, it seems our little hunting club is getting bigger. There’s no way around it.

Finally, the mainstream is digesting what we’re serving, and it’s time we recognized it’s a good thing. Hunting is growing in scope and numbers, and those who go afield after organic eats are pushing the needle. There are facts to back it up.

A report released last September by the Virginia-based research group Responsive Management explains in real terms why hunting is growing in popularity after 35 years of decline. From 2006 to 2011, the study says, hunting participation nationally increased 9 percent. The new hunters likely causing much of the uptick in participation are younger, more female and suburban, in college or in the military. Urban hunters are increasing, too.

You heard that right…urban hunters. As the world has evolved and consumption of food has become less about the why and more about the how fast, droves of previously disinterested Americans are suddenly willing to consider killing, cutting, and cooking their own meat. This isn’t your granddaddy’s old redneck stereotype. We’re talking about a new breed.

But how did we get here?

From 1958 to 1975 the number of licensed hunters in America generally increased, the study says, before hitting a plateau in the mid ’80s. Then things went into a general decline for decades with hunting not only facing stronger opposition, but also an even more dangerous absence from pop culture.

Here’s the reasoning, “In both hunting and fishing, the decline in participation from the peak in the 1980s is partly attributed to a broad demographic change in the United State—urbanization.” According to U.S. Census data, 36 percent of the United States’ population lived in rural areas in 1950. Now it’s lower than 20 percent.

If this trend continues, the only chance to grow hunting would be to convince city folk to get involved.

Read more at Petersen’s Hunting

Gable Sporting Goods started and sponsors 3:23 Archery Shoots off of Fairburn Road: Here’s Gable’s Black Friday sale flier.

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Open Season TV shared this on FaceBook this morning – and honestly, I think it’s a damn good idea for folks to know this information, since a lot of you are in the woods or will BE in the woods soon.

Click the image for more information on venomous spiders in America.

Click the image for more information on venomous spiders in America.

My friend over at March’s Outdoor Adventures is running a fundraiser to sponsor youth activities in the outdoors:  Visit his “Help Youth Get To The Outdoors” fundraiser at GoFundMe and donate a dollar or more if you can afford it!

Here is the FaceBook page for March’s Outdoor Adventures, just click the image below.

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Ok, except for one four hour span off of the pier at Gulf Shores, AL, two years ago, I haven’t fished in… lets just say ‘longer than a decade,’ shall we?   But I’ve got the bug again, and Georgia is supposed to be GREAT for fishing! (Just imagine Tony the Tiger saying that… GrrrrrrrrrEAT!)   I didn’t shoot the State Championships this year (I qualified twice, but I’m working on a few things non-archery related, and just didn’t feel competitive enough this year) so a-fishing I went.

All I caught today was a sunburn.  That’s OK, though, I fished enough in the first thirty years of my life (which I have to admit, were already some time ago) to know that sometimes, the fish aren’t biting.  Today was that day for me.  Luckily, the UV rays were out in force, and cloud cover or not, I now look like an extra from the OLD Star Trek TV show, bright, bright red.

I’m trying to save space for hunting season on this so-far-free WordPress account, so I’m going to post one photo and link that to the FaceBook account for 323 Archery, just click the photo to go to the album and view the rest if you want.

Yeah, I wore the coat for the Team Gable, and Real Avid logos. It spent the rest of the day in the locker, as my very-red arms and legs prove.

Yeah, I wore the coat for the Team Gable, and Real Avid logos. It spent the rest of the day in the locker, as my very-red arms and legs prove.

From the Georgia Department of Natural Resources at Georgiawildlife.com

(PLEASE NOTE: The counties listed for the zones are from the 2012-2013 eregulations page – CHECK this year’s regulations when they are published to ensure accuracy. The DNR did not publish a map for this information, or, if they did, they put it in a basement somewhere protected by leopards and alligators, with no lights.)

Black Bear Seasons

Northern Zone

(In Banks, Barrow, Bartow, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cherokee, Dade, Dawson, Fannin, Floyd, Forsyth, Franklin, Gilmer, Gordon, Habersham, Hall, Hart, Jackson, Lumpkin, Madison, Murray, Pickens, Rabun, Stephens, Towns, Union, Walker, White, Whitfield Cos.)

  • Archery: Sept. 14 – Oct. 11
  • Primitive Weapons: Oct. 12 – 18
  • Firearms: Oct. 19 – Dec. 1

Central Zone

(In Bibb, Houston, Twiggs Cos.)

  • Firearms: Dec. 14

Southern Zone

(In Brantley, Charlton, Clinch, Echols and Ware Cos.)

  • Firearms: Sept. 26-28; Oct 3-5; Oct 10-12

Why there isn’t an archery season in the Central or Southern zone, I have no idea.  Then again, in the Central zone, what are they going to do, say “From 7:30 am to 9:45 am, it’s archery season…”   I imagine the rule is “During Firearms season, if you want to use a bow, go for it,” but calling the DNR and asking would be the best plan.

Here are the links to more information about bears in Georgia. (Not me, actual bears.) Click on the images to load the full page:

fed bear

 

fact sheet