Archive for December, 2017

Well, I said I wanted to get out more, and this year I did, though it was a modest improvement instead of the ‘leaps and bounds’ I wanted to accomplish.  I’ll still treat it as a win though, several good hikes, bowhunted a new area over a dozen times (for me, that’s quite good, between shifting work schedules and taking care of the petting zoo around here) and even getting a couple of shots at a small buck.

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One of the quick photos I took from my stand in Camp Creek VPA Wildlife Management Area.

We managed to get a night of bowfishing in with TreeTop, and had a lot of fun at West Point that night.

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We lost Brody this year, which still hurts enough that I haven’t been able to go back and edit the post for typos and grammatical errors.  I don’t know if I ever will, every time I try to scroll back through the posts to link something for somebody, I try very hard to scroll past that post quickly.  He meant a lot to me.

I’m in the early ‘kind of’ planning stages to go backpacking while it’s still cold weather here in Georgia: I’m from the frozen north, I like thirty degree weather a heck of lot better than ninety degree weather, and I want to make some use of it while I can.  I haven’t been on a backpacking trip since Minister Creek Trail in Pennsylvania around 1990, so it’s been quite a long time. I dug an old frame pack I have been toting around for decades out of the garage and after really looking at it for a few minutes, scratched my head and told my wife “I don’t think I’ve every used this pack. The last time I did a backpacking trip, I used my pack with a metal frame. This is a polymer framed pack.”  And I honestly think that at some point in the mid 1990’s, I purchased this pack for a trip that never happened, but I’m stymied as to when or where I purchased it.  It’s nice, so I might as well put it to use.  I’m not sure where I’ll go at this point, I was looking at the Chattahoochee National Forest, but the parts of it I’m really familiar with are not really the ‘walk into the woods and camp’ part, unless you like nearly vertical hiking, however there is part of the Appalachian Trail up there that has a good reputation for being a hike and camp area, so I might try that.

I hope everyone has a safe and happy New Year.

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In April, I ordered a Etekcity backpacker sized stove with self-ignition in the hopes that I could use it to make a hot beverage or heat water to use with a dehydrated meal on the trail sometime during the year.  I didn’t end up hiking as much as I wanted to (my work schedule was changed multiple times, making it difficult to tie in with my wife’s days off, so when our days off coincided we would use the time to catch up on housework etc.) so I hadn’t used it.

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Etekcity Ultralight Portable stove with piezo ignition – this image is from Amazon.com

Recently, I watched quite a few bushcraft videos, mostly Joe Robinet and McQ Bushcraft, and remembered that I’d bought this tiny stove, but hadn’t used or tested it yet.

The stove takes butane-propane mix canisters, so on a recent shopping trip, I picked one up at REI for under $5 to test the stove out.  Be careful when buying this kind of stuff, my first stop for most gear is Amazon, but always, always double check prices with other sites and/or physical stores.  REI doesn’t even list this item on their website, and Amazon has it listed for $18.99, but it was $4.95 at the REI near Kennesaw, GA.  (In the past, I’ve found quite a few items listed by third party sellers that was outrageously priced.  One item was $8 per can at Academy Sports, and $49.00 from a third party seller on Amazon.)

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To test this, I used a tin cup I picked up in Afghanistan about ten years ago, two cups of cold tap water, and put the stove on the railing of my back porch.  I wanted to see how long it would take to bring the water to a rolling boil.  According to our outdoor thermometer, it was 34′ outside,  and Intellicast.com shows a 10-15 mph NW wind.  I don’t have a lid for the cup, and for the first seven minutes of the test, I didn’t block the wind.

The little stove heated the water very quickly, but it wouldn’t come to a boil until I stood blocking the wind, at which point roughly one minute later I had a rolling boil.  If I had a lid for the cup, and had blocked the wind from the beginning, I have no doubt that this tiny stove would have had the water boiling quite fast.

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The water started to steam in the cold air in under a minute

I really like it – the package lists the output as 6,666 BTU, which I think is really good for something under $12 that can fit in a shirt pocket.  I don’t know if I would rely on this kind of thing for long-term survival, but as a short term, light weight option for camping trips and backpacking trips, it would certainly be much faster than cutting firewood and starting a full campfire when all you want is to re-hydrate a meal and have a cup of tea before moving on. It cools down very quickly, by the time you have the meal ready to eat, it should be cool enough to put back in the carrying case.

The stove comes with an orange plastic two piece carrying case.

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This shows the stove when out of the case, in the case, and when the case is closed – Image is from Amazon.com