From Bowhunter.com

bowhunter

by Tony J. Peterson   |  February 4th, 2014

Proper bow function requires a litany of parts to do exactly what they are supposed to do during every shot cycle. When one piece of the puzzle falls out of place, the entire process is compromised.

We often focus on major tuning issues and perfect bow setup when discussing how to get our hunting rigs into shape and how to keep them there. This is fine for the minority of bow owners who possess a pro shop-grade press and the knowledge to use it.

However, for most bowhunters this is out of reach, and quite frankly, not something they’re interested in. Shelling out a grand or more for a quality press and then devoting serious time to learning how to use it is simply too much for most of us, but that doesn’t mean that all aspects of bow tuning and setup are out of your grasp.

Every year I encounter fellow bowhunters who have no idea how to tie a string loop, serve in a peep sight, or even replace a nock set. It’s not that these folks are incapable. It’s that they don’t have the simple bow tools necessary and the knowledge to put them to use.

If you’re in this category, consider taking a step in the right direction by investing a minimal amount of money into the basics, and then spend some quality time on the Internet watching tutorials on how to perform these simple tasks.

This is a good idea for hunters who never hunt anywhere other than their favorite close-to-home whitetail haunts, and it is crucial for those who hit the road in search of hunting adventure.

It’s just common sense that if you’re in elk camp and notice your string loop is frayed, that the fix is up to you and only you. I’ve been in hunting camps with friends who didn’t even bother to bring along a set of Allen wrenches. Of course, those homebody hunters who figure they will just take their bow into the shop if something goes wrong can be in for a rude awakening.

Read the rest, and see the slideshow, at Bowhunter.com

(One of the items on the list is the Real Avid Bowsmith.  Here is a video of the Bowsmith tool.)

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