Oklahoma – From a Deer Hunter’s POV

Posted: 08/28/2012 in Archery, Hunting, Legal, News, Regulations
Tags: , , , ,

This is an ongoing series looking at each state from the point of view of a nonresident hunter trying to find information about deer hunting, the basic explanation is HERE.

Oklahoma

Is the information easy to find?

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation hunting page is at the top of the search results. From the hunting page, quite a few of the links actually forward the user to the online hunting eRegulations interactive web site, which is an excellent method of moving the user to the best source of information.

Grade: A

Website: is it easy to use and understand?

From the eRegulations web page, hunters can quickly and easily find out how much licenses will cost, when to hunt, and where to hunt.  Quite a few states use eRegulations without effectively funneling the user to this service,  leaving fragmented information throughout the state’s hunting web site.

Grade: A

Does the state hold a lottery system for non-residents or are over the counter licenses available?

Over the counter licenses are the primary type of nonresident license in Oklahoma.

Nonresident Deer Licenses

Nonresidents may purchase three season-specific deer licenses: a nonresident annual deer archery license, a nonresident annual deer muzzleloader license or a nonresident annual deer gun license. Each of the three types of non-resident deer licenses permit the hunter to hunt for all deer allowed during the specified season. For the specific season limits, see the information for each season. The combined season limit of all seasons remains six deer per individual with no more than two antlered deer.

These licenses are valid on both public and private lands. Licenses are not transferable between seasons. The nonresident annual deer gun license also covers the holiday antlerless deer season. Note – Individuals hunting with a nonresident annual deer archery license will need a 2013 license for hunting after January 1, 2013.

Grade: A

How much does it cost to hunt, and is there a short term license available?

Resident hunting licenses are priced at $25.00 with $20.00 licenses for deer archery, muzzleloader and firearm permits individually.  Nonresident licenses are priced at $142.00 for an annual hunting license, however provided the hunter is only hunting deer, an annual license is not required.  Nonresident deer licenses are $280.00 each for archery, muzzleloader, and firearm season, with two deer tags per season available, with a maximum of two antlered deer combined.  There is a $26.00 Wildlife Conservation Passport permit listed, and at first it would appear to be a permit allowing hunting on OWDC land, however it is exactly the opposite, this permit is NOT REQUIRED if the user has a current hunting license.

The exemption from an annual license, simplicity of the licensing system, and generous bag limit of six deer (only two may be antlered) are all good things, however be aware that after January 1st, archery hunters would need to purchase a 2013 license.

Grade: B

Are the hunting seasons easy to find and laid out in a logical manner?

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation ‘Big Game Seasons: Deer‘ page does not have information regarding what dates are valid for hunting deer; instead this page lists license types and regulations. The Hunting Regulations: Hunting Seasons Summary page lists all of the dates needed.

Grade: B

Is public hunting available, if so, are the rules different? If the rules are different, are they easy to understand?

Public hunting is widely available in Oklahoma, with a very reasonable list of regulations that is both easy to read and easy to find.  One improvement that could be made is adding links to maps or map software.

Grade: A

Are there major issues in hunting this state as a non-resident?

There are no known cases of Chronic Wasting Disease in Oklahoma at this time.  A quick search on the internet did not find any overt issues regarding hunting or hunters in Oklahoma.

Grade: A

Summary: Final Grade A

Oklahoma has reasonable prices for deer permits when the harvest limit of six is considered, there do not appear to be any issues with hunting in the state, and the eRegulations site is nearly perfect.  The only two negatives on the eRegulation site is the lack of a search function and the Big Game deer seasons page doesn’t have a list of deer seasons on it. This has been one of the best states reviewed so far for ease of use and availability of information.

States CompletedAlabamaAlaskaArizonaArkansasCaliforniaColoradoConnecticutDelaware,

FloridaGeorgiaHawaiiIdahoIllinoisIndiana, IowaKansasKentuckyLouisianaMaineMaryland

MassachusettsMichiganMinnesotaMississippiMissouriMontanaNebraskaNevadaNew Hampshire

New JerseyNew MexicoNew YorkNorth CarolinaNorth Dakota, Ohio

Comments are closed.